birds like wires

Search

Showing 'dns' tagged articles.

Dead Simple Dynamic DNS Updater

I’d been messing with ddclient, trying to get things to play nicely with DNS-O-Matic, Tunnelbroker and Hurricane Electric’s own dynamic DNS system. Problem was, although everything was configured correctly it still wouldn’t update my DNS! It worked when I told it to, but when the IP genuinely changed, it all went wrong.

It turns out that when my IP changed, ddclient was indeed trying to update things. However, it was trying to do it over the IPv6 tunnel which, due to the altered IP address, was now broken. And I could find no way in the config to specify that the tunnel should be updated first, over IPv4. Hmm.

So, I sacked off ddclient and went for the world’s simplest dynamic DNS client. A bash script and curl.

Easy Peasy

Most of the dynamic DNS services have a simple HTTP method for updating. Some have HTTPS, so you’re not waving your password around in clear text. Switching to an IPv4-only updating mechanism is as simple as this:

Keep reading...

Tunnelbroker and Dynamic IPs

Change of plan! While the details provided here are accurate and may well be useful if you’re configuring ddclient, I found issues updating my DNS information this way. So I opted for something much simpler, which I’ve written up here.

My shiny new router, which I’m hoping to write a proper article about soon, supports IPv6 tunnelling. IPv6 is going to become increasingly important over the next decade, as we’re running out of IPv4 (the ones that look like 208.67.220.220) addresses to give to all of the devices out there. Internet service providers are going to need to pick up the pace of handing these out, but in the meantime for those that don’t (such as BT) there are tunnelling services.

An IPv6 tunnelling service does basically what it sounds like; shoves your IPv4 traffic through a tunnel so that it pops out of the other end with a valid IPv6 address. You can then access services that only use IPv6… okay, that’s not many right now, but hey – you’re future proof! There are a few different providers out there, but I use Tunnelbroker. If your router supports it, you can configure the entry point to the tunnel from the details Tunnelbroker provide and pow! You’re accessing IPv6 sites.

Keep reading...