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Raspberry Pi Status Board

Status board on a portrait-orientated display, at the bottom of some stairs.

It was only a matter of time. I’ve had two Pi boards sat around for a while now; so long, in fact, that they’re both the 256MB Model B types and weren’t made in Wales. This summer, as part of the annual revamp in our studios, the much-neglected information screen finally bobbed high enough up on the to-do list to be in danger of actually getting done. Combine that with a collection of retired portrait-capable plasma screens in the basement and we’ve got ourselves a project!

What started this all off was the buzz there had been around Panic’s latest offering: Status Board. What I found a little uncomfortable was the fact that you needed to dedicate an iPad to the job, which just seemed downright weird. I’m up to my ears in old Macs, but iPads are rather more difficult to find without being attached to a protective owner. Nevertheless, there was an option for having one that shouldn’t have needed to be unplugged and used elsewhere too often, so I hurried off and bought Status Board.

Weighing The Options

I quickly realised that while Status Board may be a great app in the right environment, to do the kind of thing I had in mind would mean writing most of the code myself anyway. There is, of course, no magic button that creates displays for monitoring studios. When you add to that the extra fee for HDMI output (which is galling enough without having to be reminded about it every time you use AirPlay for the output), plus the cost of an iPad HDMI converter and the fact that the display was standard-def and only had VGA and composite inputs; it was a non-starter.

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Tunnelbroker and Dynamic IPs

Change of plan! While the details provided here are accurate and may well be useful if you’re configuring ddclient, I found issues updating my DNS information this way. So I opted for something much simpler, which I’ve written up here.

My shiny new router, which I’m hoping to write a proper article about soon, supports IPv6 tunnelling. IPv6 is going to become increasingly important over the next decade, as we’re running out of IPv4 (the ones that look like 208.67.220.220) addresses to give to all of the devices out there. Internet service providers are going to need to pick up the pace of handing these out, but in the meantime for those that don’t (such as BT) there are tunnelling services.

An IPv6 tunnelling service does basically what it sounds like; shoves your IPv4 traffic through a tunnel so that it pops out of the other end with a valid IPv6 address. You can then access services that only use IPv6… okay, that’s not many right now, but hey – you’re future proof! There are a few different providers out there, but I use Tunnelbroker. If your router supports it, you can configure the entry point to the tunnel from the details Tunnelbroker provide and pow! You’re accessing IPv6 sites.

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